The largest independent music therapy charity in the UK, which is dedicated to changing the lives of vulnerable and isolated people, has been named a Charity Partner of Heavy Music Awards 2018.

Nordoff Robbins supports thousands of people every year through music therapy. 

Music therapy can help a child with autism to communicate, enable someone with dementia to regain their sense of identity or provide comfort for someone facing a terminal illness.

Nordoff Robbins runs six centres across England and benefits from more than 150 partnerships with a wide range of organisations including care homes, schools and hospitals.

Over the years, the charity has received substantial support from the music industry; in 1990 a concert at Knebworth Park featuring Paul McCartney, Pink Floyd, Robert Plant and Jimmy Page helped fund a new centre in Kentish Town, London, which is now their UK headquarters.

In 2009, the Andrew Lloyd Webber Foundation Nordoff Robbins Music Therapy Unit opened at BRIT School in Croydon and three years ago a facility was launched at the Royal Albert Hall.

As a Charity Partner of HMA18, Nordoff Robbins will connect for the first time directly with the heavy music scene.

Hannah Sheedy, Nordoff Robbins Director of Fundraising, said: “At Nordoff Robbins we use the power of music everyday to change the lives of vulnerable and isolated people, and we are so excited to be this year’s charity partner of the Heavy Music Awards.

“It’s a partnership which will help us to connect with the incredible creativity and passion-for-music that exists across the heavy music scene, and we are delighted to have the opportunity to share our work with the artists, producers, venues, festivals and designers being championed by HMAs.”

Iain Johnson, co-founder of the Heavy Music Awards, said: “It it a privilege to offer our support to Nordoff Robbins, an organisation that makes a profound difference to so many peoples’ lives through the wonder of music.

“We are very proud to welcome them to the HMAs.”

A wide range of instruments can be used in music therapy, including the voice, and the music created is often improvised.

Music therapists support people to develop their own ways of being musical in order to explore their potential and connect with the world around them.

In the hands of a trained practitioner, music therapy can be used to support people living with a wide range of needs.

It can help a child with autism to communicate, unlock forgotten memories for those living with dementia or provide comfort and celebrate the life of someone facing a terminal illness.

To find our more click nordoff-robbins.org.uk

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